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Cult Classic Yury Mamleyev Translated for the First Time

Seminal novel given English translation for the first time.

Published: April 11, 2014 (Issue # 1805)



  • Yury Mamleyevs book comes encased in a fretwork matryoshka.
    Photo: Haute Culture books

  • A detail of the intricate box.
    Photo: Haute Culture books

  • The suede cover of the new publication.
    Photo: Haute Culture books

Dostoevsky. Gogol. Mamleyev?

While better known in Russia than in the Western world for his metaphysical realism, dissident author Yury Mamleyevs most famous novel is about to be published in English for the first time by Haute Culture Books.

Mamleyev first began writing in the 1960s while teaching mathematics in Moscow, where he cultivated an underground following. He hosted meetings with other intellectuals to discuss philosophy and psychoanalysis, and the group began to refer to themselves as sexual mystics.

Outside of this immediate circle of fans, his literature started to garner attention through Samizdat, the secret circulation and publication of literature in the Soviet Union. It was during this period of time that he wrote his most famous work, Shatuny, or The Sublimes, as it is translated in Marian Schwartzs English version.

It was a novel that stunned the underground literary world of the Soviet Union. Part philosophy, part esoterica and laced with humor, the book quickly became a cult classic and excerpts of it slowly leaked through the cracks in the Iron Curtain.

Mamleyev emigrated to the United States in 1974 and taught Russian literature at Cornell University in New York before returning to Russia in 1993, now splitting his time between Moscow and Paris.

The books impact on Russian literature is clear: Vladimir Sorokin and Victor Pelevin both credit Mamleyev as an inspiration and Grigory Ryzhakov called the book literature in its boldest, art in its pure sense uncompromising and limitless. While not only bringing a relatively unknown author the credit deserved in the English-speaking world, the new translation hopes to inspire a generation of English writers.

The novel revolves around an assassin waiting for death but other characters include an intellectual group seeking immortality and a professor hoping for salvation through more traditional methods. Many of Mamleyevs characters are characterized as feeble-minded men who often contemplate the incomprehensible.

On the one hand, the novel may be read as reflecting modern hell, wrote Professor James McConkey of Cornell University. However, very deep down, this book offers, in fact, a religious vision, and its comedy is earnestly lethal. Yet, in view of its ironic estrangement and dynamic lure another remainder of Dostoyevsky [The Sublimes] can be read as a sort of metaphysical detective story.

His prose is devoid of actual eventsbut it holds something else instead: an eternal thing that has forever that has forever been part of man, but which nobody likes to be confronted with, wrote Vladimir Spakov in The Petersburg Book Journal. The mirror he holds up to us has turned black, reflecting our dark side. To do so, it needed a writer capable of standing at the abyss without falling or of telling the more frightful among us who pretend to be civilized: there are monsters hiding inside of you!

Haute Culture offers handmade, uniquely designed and bilingual copies of Mamleyevs classic made of suede or leather and housed in a 3D printed matryoshka. Part of the profits will go towards donating e-books to schools and universities around the world.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Oct. 30


Dental-Expo St. Petersburg 2014 concludes today at Lenexpo. Welcoming specialists from throughout the federation, the forum is an opportunity for dentists to share tricks of the trade and peruse the most recent innovations in technology and equipment, with over 100 companies hocking their wares at the event.



Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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