Friday, January 30, 2015
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS


Legendary Porcelain Artworks for Your Home
The Gift Projects online showroom...


BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

Ineffable Light

Nikolai Roerich Apartment Museum

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский

Price Hike Sees Illegal Vodka on the Rise

Published: April 17, 2014 (Issue # 1806)



  • Illegal vodka accounted for 55 percent of the entire vodka market in 2013, Igor Kosarev, vice president of distiller Russky Standart, told Kommersant.
    Photo: Maxim Stulov / Vedomosti

Legal vodka production plummeted nearly 17 percent in the first quarter this year under the weight of a state-enforced price increase and a flourishing illegal market, Kommersant reported Tuesday, citing Rosstat data.

Illegal vodka accounted for 55 percent of the entire vodka market in 2013, Igor Kosarev, vice president of distiller Russky Standart, told Kommersant.

"Given the trend that we see now, by the end of the year this share will increase to 64 percent," Kosarev said.

Just as illegally produced vodka is increasing, there is an "avalanche of stores now selling alcohol without a license," said Alexander Mechetin, CEO of alcohol producer Synergy.

Sixteen percent of stores selling alcohol in large Russian cities do not have the necessary license, according to recent research by Infoline market analysts.

The legal market has lost even more business since the state increased the minimum retail price of vodka from 170 rubles ($4.72) to 199 rubles for a half-liter bottle on March 11.

Sales of legal vodka in the lower price segment "have noticeably decreased" since that time, said Vadim Drobiz, director of the Research Center for Federal and Regional Alcohol Markets.

The situation could be further exacerbated on Aug. 1, when the minimum price will go up to 220 rubles for a half-liter bottle.

Producers of other alcoholic drinks also cut back production in the first quarter: production of Russian brandy fell nearly 21 percent to 1.3 million decaliters, while table wine fell 14.5 percent to 6.3 million decaliters and sparkling wines fell 15 percent to less than 2 million decaliters.

Isaac Sheps, chairman of the Union of Russian Brewers, predicted late last year that the beer market could shrink 25 to 30 percent in 2014, Vedomosti reported.

The market has been struck in recent years by bans on advertising alcohol in the streets, Internet and mass media, and another last year which prohibited selling alcohol after 11 p.m. and banned beer sales from street kiosks.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Jan. 29



Attend a master class on how to deal with complicated business negotiations today at the International Banking Institute, 6 Malaya Sadovaya Ulitsa. Running from 3 to 6 p.m., Vadim Sokolov, an assistant professor at the St. Petersburg State University of Economics, will introduce aspects of managing the negotiation process and increasing its effectiveness. Attendance is free with pre-registration by telephone on 909 3056 or online at www.ibispb.ru



Celebrate what would be writer Anton Chekhov's 155th birthday at the Bokvoed bookshop at 46 Nevsky Prospekt. Starting at 5 p.m., the legendary author will be feted with readings of his stories and short performances based on his plays by various St. Petersburg actors. Chekhov's books will also be offered at a 15% discount during the event.



Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous’ in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of ‘Repulsion’ at 7 p.m. and ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy ‘The Tenant,’ the cult comedy ‘The Fearless Vampire Killers’ and ‘Cul-de-sac’ among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



Times Talk