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Crimea Worsens Economic Crisis

Published: April 30, 2014 (Issue # 1808)


It is no simple task foreconomists tocalculate thecosts ofRussias current foreign policy course, thelosses resulting fromfrightened investors andcreditors andthe damage that sanctions will cause. Some claim that any lack ofenthusiasm forthe economy however justifiable is patently unpatriotic. Others hold just theopposite view, condemning any attempt topropose this or that economic policy given theposition inwhich Russia now finds itself.

Before seizing Crimea, thegovernment should have done more toreduce corruption andimprove theclimate forbusinesses andforeign investors. Theevents inCrimea andeastern Ukraine make both foreign anddomestic investors even more skittish. They also lower Russians faith inthe ruble andin Russian banks.

There is now aneven greater need toimprove theenvironment forbusiness andinvestors. Thequestions Russias leaders need toask themselves are: How can we give businesspeople more investment opportunities? How can we facilitate technology transfer given theworsening situation?

Under thecurrent circumstances, Russia must focus onachieving aradical reduction inthe bureaucracy forbusinesses bysimplifying all procedures. Forstarters, Moscow could simplify therules forobtaining aRussian visa andwaive theneed forcertification if imported products have already been certified inthe U.S. or theEuropean Union.

Instead, it seems that authorities are competing with each other tosee who can do themost harm tothe economy. One top Russian official proposed selling off thecountrys dollar andeuro reserves without explaining how they would be replaced. Perhaps he would prefer theyen andyuan. But aquick look atthe currencies preferred bythe central banks ofother countries is enough toshow that they are far less reliable. Maybe he feels Russia should keep its money ingold.

Forevery difficult andcomplex situation, leaders should respond with better andmore responsible economic policy andnot just make matters worse.

Konstantin Sonin, acolumnist forVedomosti, is Professor ofEconomics andVice Rector atthe Higher School ofEconomics inMoscow.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only mans best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during todays reenactment titled Winter War: How it Was. More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie Black Cat, White Cat, as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of Takoy Festival, a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonights festival finale is Fathers and Sons, a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenevs classic about familial relations.



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