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Hundreds March Down Nevsky in Protest

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • LGBT marchers joined the parade down Nevsky Prospekt on May 1.
    Photo: Sergey Chernov / SPT

  • The LGBT contingent was led by a man in a red dress wearing a large papier-mache head of Putin with a crown.
    Photo: Sergey Chernov / SPT

Hundreds of protesters marched along St. Petersburgs main street, Nevsky Prospekt, on May 1, to protest against the Kremlins actions in Ukraine. The protest was held as part of the May Day demonstrations which traditionally features a broad political spectrum of protests from animal rights activists to neo-Nazis, but most were pro-Kremlin parties and movements such as United Russia, Just Russia and the Communist Party of the Russian Federation.

Police estimate that up to 37,000 people participated in the various marches along Nevsky, mostly from parties and movements loyal to the Kremlin. The different political groups marched at a distance from each other, separated by police and then went on to hold stationary rallies at different sites in central St. Petersburg.

The main slogan written on the Anti-War Democratic Marchs banner, which was carried by the front row of the protesters, said For Friendship with Ukraine and the European Integration of Russia. No to U.S.S.R. 2.0.

Protesters carried placards proclaiming For Democracy in Russia and Ukraine, War Is Madness, Putin. God Sees Everything. Stop, Ukraine, God Is on Your Side and Putin, Leave Ukraine Alone, Better Feed Our Old People and Children.

Organized by the Democratic St. Petersburg coalition, the Anti-War Democratic March drew between 1,000 and 1,500 protesters, organizer Natalya Tsymbalova said. Protesters included those from the Yabloko Democratic Party, human rights groups, Free Ingria group and LGBT rights groups. The protesters also carried small Russian, Ukrainian and European Union flags.

Tsymbalova considered the number to be large for St. Petersburg. I think its a lot, because fewer people have attended in previous years, she told The St. Petersburg Times.

The protesters also marched to music blared from a vehicle in front of the group. The musical pieces included the national anthem of Ukraine, the Patriotic Song by Russian composer Mikhail Glinka, which served as the national anthem of Russia until it was abolished by President Vladimir Putin in 2000, and Beethovens Ode to Joy, the national anthem of the European Union and the Council of Europe.

According to Tsymbalova, city authorities did not object to the slogans used during the march and the subsequent stationary rally, even after City Hall had twice refused to authorize the rally ahead of May 1. However, this happens every time. They just want to show whos the boss, whos the one who issues permits, she said.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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