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Hundreds March Down Nevsky in Protest

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • LGBT marchers joined the parade down Nevsky Prospekt on May 1.
    Photo: Sergey Chernov / SPT

  • The LGBT contingent was led by a man in a red dress wearing a large papier-mache head of Putin with a crown.
    Photo: Sergey Chernov / SPT

Hundreds of protesters marched along St. Petersburgs main street, Nevsky Prospekt, on May 1, to protest against the Kremlins actions in Ukraine. The protest was held as part of the May Day demonstrations which traditionally features a broad political spectrum of protests from animal rights activists to neo-Nazis, but most were pro-Kremlin parties and movements such as United Russia, Just Russia and the Communist Party of the Russian Federation.

Police estimate that up to 37,000 people participated in the various marches along Nevsky, mostly from parties and movements loyal to the Kremlin. The different political groups marched at a distance from each other, separated by police and then went on to hold stationary rallies at different sites in central St. Petersburg.

The main slogan written on the Anti-War Democratic Marchs banner, which was carried by the front row of the protesters, said For Friendship with Ukraine and the European Integration of Russia. No to U.S.S.R. 2.0.

Protesters carried placards proclaiming For Democracy in Russia and Ukraine, War Is Madness, Putin. God Sees Everything. Stop, Ukraine, God Is on Your Side and Putin, Leave Ukraine Alone, Better Feed Our Old People and Children.

Organized by the Democratic St. Petersburg coalition, the Anti-War Democratic March drew between 1,000 and 1,500 protesters, organizer Natalya Tsymbalova said. Protesters included those from the Yabloko Democratic Party, human rights groups, Free Ingria group and LGBT rights groups. The protesters also carried small Russian, Ukrainian and European Union flags.

Tsymbalova considered the number to be large for St. Petersburg. I think its a lot, because fewer people have attended in previous years, she told The St. Petersburg Times.

The protesters also marched to music blared from a vehicle in front of the group. The musical pieces included the national anthem of Ukraine, the Patriotic Song by Russian composer Mikhail Glinka, which served as the national anthem of Russia until it was abolished by President Vladimir Putin in 2000, and Beethovens Ode to Joy, the national anthem of the European Union and the Council of Europe.

According to Tsymbalova, city authorities did not object to the slogans used during the march and the subsequent stationary rally, even after City Hall had twice refused to authorize the rally ahead of May 1. However, this happens every time. They just want to show whos the boss, whos the one who issues permits, she said.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Dec. 21


The Zenit St. Petersburg basketball team returns to the northern capital this evening for a matchup with Krasny Oktyabr, a Volgograd-based basketball club. Tickets for the game, which tips off at 6 p.m. this evening, can be purchased on the clubs website or at their arena, Sibur Arena, on Krestovsky island.


Satisfy your sugar cravings during Sweet New Year, an ongoing seasonal festival at the Raduga shopping center. Each weekend of December will welcome hungry visitors to taste hundreds of different kinds of desserts. Workshops are open to visitors and seasonal gifts can also be purchased for those rushing to finish their New Year shopping.



Monday, Dec. 22


Pick out the latest fashions as holiday gifts for loved ones or as early presents for yourself during the Christmas Design Sale at Kraft on Obvodny Kanal, starting on Dec. 20 and continuing through Dec. 27. Designer clothes will be on sale every day of the week or you can buy something more festive to decorate the home while sipping on hot coffee and perusing the various master classes.



Tuesday, Dec. 23


Meet Arctic explorers Fedor Konukhov and Viktor Simonov during SPIBAs and Capital Legal Services event Arctic Expedition this morning in the Mertens House business center at 21 Nevsky Prospekt. The meeting will discuss the explorers ongoing eco-social project and how companies can use the project as a unique marketing opportunity. Email office@spiba.ru by Dec. 22 if you wish to attend.



Wednesday, Dec. 24


The Anglican Church of St. Petersburg we will be holding a Christmas Eve service at 7 p.m. led by Rev Wm. Shepley Curtis of the Episcopal Church. The service will be held at the Swedish Church at 1/3 Malaya Konyushennaya Ulitsa.



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