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Impact of War Losing Its Effect on Youth

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • As the generation gap widens, more youngsters are growing up without the important war memories shared by veterans.
    Photo: Alexander Belinky / spt

Almost half a million people who died during World War II lie in the 186 mass graves found at St. Petersburgs Piskaryovskoye Memorial Cemetery. This number includes 420,000 civilians killed from starvation, disease and enemy attacks,

Nearly every family in St. Petersburg has a relative or knows of someone buried there, with many regarding the upcoming Victory Day on May 9 as one of the years most significant celebrations, its importance surpassing other, more joyous celebrations such as Christmas and New Year. However, as the years pass, fewer veterans are alive to share their stories, and the younger generation is growing up with less knowledge and understanding of what happened during those years.

Galina Semenova is one of a dwindling number of people left in the city who remembers May 9, 1945. Now 79, Semenova was only 10 when she first heard news of the victory on the radio. Having lost two of the four members of her family during the war, she recalls the moment with mixed emotions; incredible happiness at the war finally being over and deep sorrow for all those who had died.

We forgot how to cry during the Siege, she said. I remember I cried when my father died and then the next time I cried was on the night of May 8 when the radio, which was on all night, informed us of all the latest news about the victory. It was a mixture of emotions grief and joy. People were sobbing as they visited and consoled one another. While we were overjoyed by the victory, we all felt the enormity of what we had lost during the war. Every household suffered, she said.

People remember and celebrate Victory Day with tears in their eyes. Its a day where I feel more emotion than any other day.

Looking back, Semenova remembers May 9, 1945, as being a bright and sunny day. Along with her classmate Katya, the two girls were on their way to school when they decided to stop by Katyas uncles house.

Everyone was out in the streets and the atmosphere was full of joy, said Semenova. When we arrived at Katyas uncles house we were given some braga [homemade alcohol]. I remember it being a muddy-looking liquid. Both Katya and I drank a glass and we then immediately lay on the floor and fell asleep, missing the official events at school that day. We got into a lot of trouble with our teachers since we were good students with excellent marks and they could not understand why we would miss such an important day at school. Of course, we didnt tell them what really happened. Having not slept the night before because of the announcement, added to the alcohol, we were so exhausted that we slept until evening. This is how I first celebrated Victory Day, she laughed.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Dec. 21


The Zenit St. Petersburg basketball team returns to the northern capital this evening for a matchup with Krasny Oktyabr, a Volgograd-based basketball club. Tickets for the game, which tips off at 6 p.m. this evening, can be purchased on the clubs website or at their arena, Sibur Arena, on Krestovsky island.


Satisfy your sugar cravings during Sweet New Year, an ongoing seasonal festival at the Raduga shopping center. Each weekend of December will welcome hungry visitors to taste hundreds of different kinds of desserts. Workshops are open to visitors and seasonal gifts can also be purchased for those rushing to finish their New Year shopping.



Monday, Dec. 22


Pick out the latest fashions as holiday gifts for loved ones or as early presents for yourself during the Christmas Design Sale at Kraft on Obvodny Kanal, starting on Dec. 20 and continuing through Dec. 27. Designer clothes will be on sale every day of the week or you can buy something more festive to decorate the home while sipping on hot coffee and perusing the various master classes.



Tuesday, Dec. 23


Meet Arctic explorers Fedor Konukhov and Viktor Simonov during SPIBAs and Capital Legal Services event Arctic Expedition this morning in the Mertens House business center at 21 Nevsky Prospekt. The meeting will discuss the explorers ongoing eco-social project and how companies can use the project as a unique marketing opportunity. Email office@spiba.ru by Dec. 22 if you wish to attend.



Wednesday, Dec. 24


The Anglican Church of St. Petersburg we will be holding a Christmas Eve service at 7 p.m. led by Rev Wm. Shepley Curtis of the Episcopal Church. The service will be held at the Swedish Church at 1/3 Malaya Konyushennaya Ulitsa.



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