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Students Discover the Importance of Victory Day

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • Veterans of World War II and the Siege of Leningrad wave to crowds of spectators along Nevsky Prospekt (File).
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / SPT

As an assignment, a number of classes at St. Petersburg School 327 were asked to write about Victory Day, explaining why it is an important day to celebrate and what it means to them. Below includes just a small selection of some of the insightful and thoughtful words by these young students.

This is the day I remember my great-great-grandfather. His name was Martyan and I was named in honor of him. I dont know a lot about him, but I am very proud that I have his name. For me, May 9 is a great day that makes me cry for those who died, and to also remember the history behind my name. Martyan Baranov, 9th grade.

I dont think we would have won the war if it had happened now. Nowadays people are less united and think mostly about themselves. Today, if one sees a fight, he records it on his mobile instead of trying to stop it. The May 9 celebration affects everybody, as our lives today depended on that victory. Its victory unites people. It is a day of sorrow and happiness. Alexander Akimov, 7th grade.

This celebration is so important and significant in Russia because the war hurt every family, it affected every household. Gleb Schennikov, 9th grade.

For me, Victory Day is a reason to say thank you to all those who fought in the war and to think about my own life; to see how good everything is in my life and to appreciate it. I have a home, family and food these are the most important things one needs in life. Back during the tragic war years, not everybody had these three basic things. Listening to stories, reading articles and watching films about the war makes me think and want to do something useful for society. I dont want to live without a purpose, but instead do something wonderful. Liza Vedeneeva, 10th grade.

It was Russia that had the strongest resistance against Germany and it was Russia that suffered the largest loss. Most European countries did not resist or defend in the way that Russia did back then. The most severe battles, where thousands of people died, were in Russia. May 9 is an important day for us, as we honor the memory of the grandfathers and great-grandfathers who died in the war. Natalia Komarova, 9th grade.

I want to say thank you, that together with other people, you defended our Fatherland. Even in the harshest cold, you stayed on the battlefields and did not surrender. Thank you because we have never known what war is. In your eyes, you had the fire of hope while you ignored the fear that tried to take your heart. You did everything to give life to your children, grandsons and great-grandsons. War is a time of sorrow, death and fear. You went into battle with the hope and faith that you can change everything. I am sorry people of our generation continue to fight and bring harm to each other. We need to stop fighting; otherwise nothing will be left in our world. I believe that one day I will wake up on an earth, where murder is just a word, so that your efforts will not have been in vain. Dmitry Kabanov, 7th grade (part of a letter written to his great-grand father Vasily)





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Aug. 20


AmCham gets back to business after a summer hiatus with todays EHS Committee Working Group Meeting. Check their website for more details.



Thursday, Aug. 21


Time is running out to see the fantastic creations on display at the 2014 Sand Castle Festival on the beach at the Peter and Paul Fortress. Adhering to the theme of Treasure Island, visitors can wander amongst larger-than-life interpretations of pirate life or attend one of the workshops held to educate a future generation of sand artists. The castles will remain on the beach until Aug. 31.



Friday, Aug. 22


Get ready to pledge allegiance to the flag during National Flag Day, paying tribute to when, 23 years ago today, the iconic hammer-and-sickle was replaced with the tricolor that now flutters in the wind. Petersburgers will be treated to a free concert on Palace Square, a military parade and a culminating air show featuring Russias Russian Knights stunt pilots.



Saturday, Aug. 23


Uppsala Park plays host to Fairy Noon today, a performance of five separate fairy tales ranging from folk classics to more haunting selections. There will be three different renditions of the tales throughout the day and tickets start at 500 rubles ($13.80) for adults and 300 rubles ($8.30) for children.


Classic Finnish cartoon characters the Moomins expect to receive a warm welcome from Russian fans during todays Moomin Festival at the Pearl Plaza Shopping Center at 51 Petergofskoye Shosse. Become a kid again or introduce a new generation to the beloved creation of Finnish writer Tove Jansson.



Sunday, Aug. 24


The tortured genius of Dutch master Vincent van Gogh gets his day in the centers Konnushnaya Ploschad during Make Art Like Van Gogh, a daylong celebration of the artist that will allow amateur artists to try and replicate the work that made the famed painter world-renowned.


Experience a variety of dances highlighting the diversity of the world around as at the final day of the Ethno-Dance International Dance Festival that has been at the St. Petersburg Humanitarian University of Trade Unions this past week. Tonights performance will feature Egyptian dancers accompanied by local orchestras.



Monday, Aug. 25


Today kicks off the Elena Obraztsovoy International Competition for Young Vocalists in the large hall of the Shostakovich Philharmonic. Talented youngsters will showcase their range over the next six days before a winner is chosen on Aug. 30.



Tuesday, Aug. 26


Love movies but hate all those words? Then check out Rodina Cinema Centers Factor of Consensus film forum this evening. Silent movie classics from the beginning of the 20th century will be screened and accompanied by a pianist, who will provide the soundtrack for the ongoing action. The screenings begin at 7 p.m. Check Rodinas website for more details.



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