Wednesday, January 28, 2015
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS


Legendary Porcelain Artworks for Your Home
The Gift Projects online showroom...


BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

The Kublitsky-Piotukh Family

Alexander Blok Apartment Museum

 

Peters Great Toy Army

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • Peter the Greats toy army went on to become an elite military unit.
    Photo: Alexei Kivshenko / Wikimedia Commons

Throughout St. Petersburg you can see references to preobrazhensky meaning transfiguration. These references are particularly frequent around Liteiny Prospekt and one could be forgiven for thinking that they are a reflection of the religious character of Russian society. Instead, they reflect the critical role that the Preobrazhensky regiment played in Russias history and its curious inception.

A favorite story told about Peter the Great is how he used to play soldiers and created his own toy army his poteshnye voiska. The story is often told to reveal Peters ambition and his ability to organize his peers but the creation of this toy army is firmly rooted in the political rivalry of the late 17th century.

The death of Tsar Fedor III on April 27, 1682, caused a political crisis in Russia. The Romanov family was split into two factions with the obvious heirs to the throne still in their minority. Streltsy troops were spurred into rebellion by rumors, spread by the Mikhailovsky faction opposed to Peter the Greats accession. On May 17, Streltsy troops broke into the Kremlin and killed in front of the 10 year old prince, Peters two uncles Kirill and Ivan Naryshkin. Although, Peter survived the attack, it had a deep impact on the tsarevich.

The political solution led to the regency of Sophia Alekseyevna during the minority of Peter the Great and Ivan V. It was this same year that Peter established his poteshnye voiska with which he played his war games.

Whether or not this was just a child wanting to play soldiers, the poteshnye voiska soon took on a much more serious nature and by 1683 the troops consisted not only of Peters friends and servants, but had also recruited a serving soldier and the toy army was organized into a unit of 100. By the time Peter was 13, the toy army was recruiting soldiers and foreign officers to provide military expertise and specific military training to the so-called toy army. Whether Peter intended it or not, he was creating a personal bodyguard which would form the basis of his later political authority.

The establishment and ongoing development of Peters toy army is also important for the insights it gives into Peter the Greats own military education and his approach to military affairs. His military training focused on taking children at a young age and developing their physical strength and agility at the ages of 9 to 12 by playing games and doing gymnastic exercises. The next step was to develop childrens bravery by adding an element of danger to the games by climbing cliffs and ravines, walking on rickety bridges, playing on logs and pretending to be bandits. These games also included guard duty and reconnaissance. The next stage in developing childrens military abilities included teaching them to use weapons Peter the Great could fire a canon when he was 12. Other technical skills were also taught and a greater focus was placed on discipline, honor and comradeship. Patriotism and purpose were also taught by teaching selective moments of Russias history and the dangers and ambitions of neighboring countries. From these classes, children were taught a love of their fatherland and a love for the army.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Jan. 28



Feel like becoming a publishing mogul? Stop by the Freedom anti-cafe at 7 Ulitsa Kazanskaya today at 8 p.m. where Simferopol, Crimea-based founder and chief editor of the Holst online magazine will talk about creating an internet magaine, including what stories to cover, how find an audience and build a team, where to find inspiration and how to stand out from the crowd. Admission is the normal price of the anti-café 2 rubles per minute, which includes tea and snacks.



Learn everything you always wanted to know about wine, and perhaps a bit more, at the Le Nez du Vin seminar for wine lovers. Held at the WineJet Sommelier School, 100 Bolshoy Prospekt Petrograd Side, at 7:30 p.m., the event will cover wine production, the basics of wine tasting, the concept of terroir and the various countries where wine is produced. Tickets are 750 rubles and include a wine tasting. Register by calling +7 921 744 6264.



Thursday, Jan. 29



Attend a master class on how to deal with complicated business negotiations today at the International Banking Institute, 6 Malaya Sadovaya Ulitsa. Running from 3 to 6 p.m., Vadim Sokolov, an assistant professor at the St. Petersburg State University of Economics, will introduce aspects of managing the negotiation process and increasing its effectiveness. Attendance is free with pre-registration by telephone on 909 3056 or online at www.ibispb.ru



Celebrate what would be writer Anton Chekhov's 155th birthday at the Bokvoed bookshop at 46 Nevsky Prospekt. Starting at 5 p.m., the legendary author will be feted with readings of his stories and short performances based on his plays by various St. Petersburg actors. Chekhov's books will also be offered at a 15% discount during the event.



Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of Repulsion at 7 p.m. and Rosemarys Baby at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy The Tenant, the cult comedy The Fearless Vampire Killers and Cul-de-sac among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



Times Talk