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Cannes Winner 'Leviathan' Might be Banned for Profanity

Published: June 7, 2014 (Issue # 1814)



  • Andrei Zvyagintsevs Leviathan portrays the plight of a family living by the remote Barents Sea whose family home is expropriated by bureaucrats.
    Photo: Sony Pictures Classics

Andrei Zvyagintsev's new film "Leviathan," which was awarded the prize for best screenplay at the Cannes Film Festival, might be rejected by Russian distributors due to profane language in the film.

The film, which will be distributed in over 50 countries, might not make it to screens in Russia due to the new law regulating profanity in movies, theater and concerts, which will take effect on June 1. While theater owners might want to show Zvyagintsev's masterpiece, few of them are willing to risk the potential fines that could come from screening it.

The new law states that companies can be fined 40,000 to 50,000 rubles for a single violation of the law, while repeat violations can bring fines of up to 100,000 rubles, or a mandatory closure of the offending theater for three months

"Of course, we would like to show 'Leviathan,' we try to work with all interesting films," said Anna Popova, director of the Eldar movie theater's repertoire department, Izvestia reported. "However, if the showing would entail a violation of the law, then we must examine the matter. The law has just been passed, so we and all other theaters need a new mechanism to observe the new requirements."

Alexander Rodyansky, producer of "Leviathan," hopes to find a way to distribute the film as it is, saying that Zvyagintsev "was very careful in his use of uncensored language," adding that profanity plays an important role in the film as "one of the main characteristics of the characters: like in that kind of situation, living in those kinds of conditions, talk more or less like that."

"Leviathan" is the latest film from Russian director Andrei Zvyagintsev, best known for his 2003 film "The Return" that won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival. Some critics have called "Leviathan" a continuation of his 2011 film "Elena," which depicted the life of inhabitants of a crumbling Soviet apartment building in Moscow's suburbs.

"Leviathan" takes the action far north, focusing on a small family living on the shores of the Barents Sea who try to defend their home against a corrupt local government that wants to seize their land. The kafkaesque tale if loosely based on the book of Job, yet set in a bleak modern-day Russia where corrupt and drunken bureaucrats twist the law and the courts for personal squabbles and profit.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 29


Park Pobedy will feature the sights and sounds of the world outside of Russia during the Open Art International Festival today. Taste foreign cuisine, learn how to make tea like the Chinese or relax in a hammock during the free event. Although entrance is free, you must register beforehand if you wish to attend.



Saturday, Aug. 30


Break out the tweed and channel your inner Englishman during the English Hunt Picnic this afternoon organized by the Bagmut stables from Krasny Bor in the Leningrad Oblast. Equestrian stunts, English archery and classic hunting fashion will all be available to visitors hoping to live like the characters in Downton Abbey if only for a day. Tickets for the event cost 7,900 rubles ($219.40).


Bookworms will have their chance to swap out well-read classics for something new for their bookshelves at Knigovorot, a free book exchange that will be held in the Yusupov Garden on Sadovaya Ulitsa today. Come for the chance to get a new book or take the opportunity to discuss the literary merits of your favorite authors with fellow fans.



Sunday, Aug. 31


The Neva Delta International Blues Festival wraps up this afternoon on Vasilevsky Island with a concert featuring not only some of Russias best blues bands but international stars as well. Admission is free for all three days of the festival, which begins on Aug. 29, and the shows starting at 5 p.m. each day.



Monday, Sept. 1


Today marks the beginning of Lermontov-Fest, a fall festival celebrating the life of one of Russias most remarkable poets who, in a fate eerily similar to Pushkins, was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Organized by the Lermontov Library System, the next several months will see art exhibitions, concerts and public lectures focusing on the Lermontovs short yet prolific career. Check the Lermontov Library Systems website for more details.



Tuesday, Sept. 2


Join expats and practice your Russian during the Russian Clubs weekly meetings every Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. The club is free to participate in although you need to be a registered member of Couchsurfing.



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