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Max Kraynov: Helping Russians Travel for Less

Published: June 11, 2014 (Issue # 1815)



  • The Russian-born managing director of Aviasales now resides in Australia.
    Photo: Aviasales

Max Kraynov is the Russian-born managing director of Russias largest travel search engine, Aviasales. The search engine helps customers find cheap flights and holiday accommodation online or via its apps (operating under the JetRadarbrand outside Russia). While the company is based in Thailand, Kraynov works from sunny Australia, adding to the companys international flavor.

The St. Petersburg Times met with Kraynov, who was in St. Petersburg at the end of May, to discuss the differences in the Russian and Australian working culture, the growing success of Aviasales in the Russian travel industry and the companys future plans.

Q: How did you find yourself living in Australia?

A: When I graduated from Russias Samara State University in 2001, specializing in applied mathematics, I moved to New York City to work as a programmer. During the day I worked as a programmer in a bank, while at night and on the weekends I spent time working on my own company developing technologies for mobile content such as ringtones, wallpapers and videos a growing trend at that time. However, in 2006, I sold my company, called Unwiredtec, to then Australia-based Mobile Messenger and moved to Australia as part of the deal. While in Australia, I got my MBA and spent some time working for the local telephone company Optus.

In August 2011, I joined Aviasales, with whom Id consulted on an on-and-off basis for a couple of years prior. By that time, almost all the staff of the company that was initially founded in St. Petersburg had moved to Thailand. From the beginning, I always said I would never move to Thailand since my family was settled in Australia.

Q: You have experience working in three completely different countries: Russia, the U.S. and Australia. How does the business culture differ in each?

A: Well, in Russia the idea of being a boss makes one believe that the employees are inferior. Therefore the culture sees people wait patiently for what the boss has to say. This is called power distance and it is still very popular in Russia, rooted in the countrys culture for centuries. It was how the country survived.

In Australia, however, the story is completely different. Australia is quite a young country, so the power distance culture is virtually non-existent because everyone started from the same place. Therefore the relationship between the boss and his or her employees is much more relaxed. However, I feel it makes people set less ambitious goals for themselves, whereas in Russia, businessmen tend to set very ambitious goals for themselves, which is still nice to see.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Oct. 30


Dental-Expo St. Petersburg 2014 concludes today at Lenexpo. Welcoming specialists from throughout the federation, the forum is an opportunity for dentists to share tricks of the trade and peruse the most recent innovations in technology and equipment, with over 100 companies hocking their wares at the event.



Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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