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Kremlins Film Funding Under Fire

With the state donating billions of rubles to the film industry in recent years, many are now questioning its motives.

Published: June 18, 2014 (Issue # 1816)



  • Director Andrei Zvyagintsev after winning for best screenplay for Leviathan in Cannes last month.
    Photo: Thibault Camus / AP

  • Films such as Stalingrad suit the Kremlins conservative ideology.
    Photo: WDSPPR

When Andrei Zvyagintsevs Leviathan, asocial satire ofRussia based onthe stories ofthe biblical Job andU.S. vigilante Marvin Heemeyer, premiered atthe Cannes Film Festival last month, it scored aBest Screenplay award andsold tomore than 50 countries.

It did not sell toRussia.

TheRussian film market is theeighth biggest inthe world, but domestic production struggles fora market share against Hollywood, which spends as much money ona single blockbuster as theentire Russian film industry does ona years worth ofreleases.

Thegovernment has stepped up inrecent years toplug therevenue gap with lavish subsidies.

But while theplan is tocreate aself-sufficient film industry, theworst-case scenario is therise ofpropagandist cinema funded forideological correctness, not artistic quality or commercial prospects, experts warned.

The danger is present though filmmakers remain free fornow, said Nina Romodanovskaya, thehead ofmovie industry portal ProfiCinema.ru.

They may not have long left. Ina telling example, Leviathan, which hoped tosecure domestic distribution atthe 25th Kinotavr Film Festival, which ran inSochi fromJune 1 to8, already risked aban inRussia beyond thefestival circuit.

Theproblem was that thefilm contains expletives, which are now prohibited under arecent law endorsed bythe Culture Ministry, whose head Vladimir Medinsky is known forhis ultrapatriotic andultraconservative stance.

Medinsky stressed inMay that he would not cut any slack toZvyagintsev, who will have toedit his satirical production or not see it released athome.

He also confessed todisliking Leviathan, while admitting it was atalented movie. Russians do not drink that much, theminister was cited as saying.

Not Welcome atHome

TheSoviet Union, despite ideological censorship, had athriving film industry with anannual audience ofsome 220 million viewers inthe 1980s, according tocinema news website Film.ru, andbagged several Academy Award andCannes wins no mean feat frombehind theIron Curtain.

That only makes all themore astonishing theindustrys annihilation after theSoviet Unions collapse, as movie theaters fell intodisrepair andpeople opted forpirated videocassettes. In1997, annual ticket sales stood at0.25 per capita, according tomarketing company Nevafilm Research. Inother words, only one infour Russians went tothe movies atleast once that year.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, July 31


Develop your leadership abilities during a lecture by famous Russian author and coach Radislav Gandapas. The event starts at 9 a.m. at 5 Lodeinopolskaya Ulitsa. The price for entry is 20,500 rubles ($570).


Relax and enjoy a Parisian atmosphere with some romantic and laidback jazz tunes during the Night of French Music at Lenny Jam Cafe, 63 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 250 rubles ($7).


The Womens Business Club is hosting a Beauty Brunch where participants are invited to discuss the latest news in the beauty industry and listen to lectures by professional stylists in the business.



Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldnt miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoyed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



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