Friday, August 29, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Putin Adviser Calls Poroshenko Nazi Leader of 'Frankenstein' Country

Published: June 27, 2014 (Issue # 1817)



  • Sergei Glazyev, adviser to Russian President Vladimir Putin, calls Poroshenko a Nazi leader.
    Photo: Vedomosti

A senior economic adviser to Russian President Vladimir Putin has slammed Ukrainian leader Petro Poroshenko ahead of the country's signing of an EU deal on Friday, calling him an illegitimate president and a Nazi.

In an interview with the BBC published on Friday, Sergei Glazyev said Ukraine had a "clear Nazi government," which was employing force against its own people in the country's east.

"As for [Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseni] Yatsenyuk and Mr. Poroshenko, their coming to power is closely related to the government coup, which happened in Ukraine on the basis of Nazist slogans," he said.

Glazyev added Moscow did not consider Poroshenko a legitimate president, saying: "There is no official recognition, we speak with him, but we speak with him as a person who is leading a part of Ukraine [...] by effect, not by law."

Glazyev's comments came just hours before Poroshenko signed an association agreement with the European Union, marking a significant turn westwards for a country that has historically and culturally aligned itself with Russia.

Asked whether he thought the agreement would remove Ukraine from Russia's sphere of influence, Glazyev said a surprise awaited the European public, "when this Nazist Frankenstein ... will knock [at] these countries' doors."

The country's former president, Viktor Yanukovych, was ousted in February following months of unrest after he turned his back on an EU association agreement, days before he was due to sign it, in favor of closer ties with Russia.

Since then, Ukraine has all but split into two — with pro-Russian separatists in the country's east refusing to acknowledge the legitimacy of the new Kiev leadership and setting up self-proclaimed republics. Hundreds of people have died in the ensuing violence, with the Ukrainian government employing armed forces in an attempt to regain control of the eastern regions.

Speaking after the signing of the agreement on Friday, Poroshenko said Ukraine had "paid the highest possible price to make her European dreams come true."





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 29


Park Pobedy will feature the sights and sounds of the world outside of Russia during the Open Art International Festival today. Taste foreign cuisine, learn how to make tea like the Chinese or relax in a hammock during the free event. Although entrance is free, you must register beforehand if you wish to attend.



Saturday, Aug. 30


Break out the tweed and channel your inner Englishman during the English Hunt Picnic this afternoon organized by the Bagmut stables from Krasny Bor in the Leningrad Oblast. Equestrian stunts, English archery and classic hunting fashion will all be available to visitors hoping to live like the characters in “Downton Abbey” if only for a day. Tickets for the event cost 7,900 rubles ($219.40).


Bookworms will have their chance to swap out well-read classics for something new for their bookshelves at Knigovorot, a free book exchange that will be held in the Yusupov Garden on Sadovaya Ulitsa today. Come for the chance to get a new book or take the opportunity to discuss the literary merits of your favorite authors with fellow fans.



Sunday, Aug. 31


The Neva Delta International Blues Festival wraps up this afternoon on Vasilevsky Island with a concert featuring not only some of Russia’s best blues bands but international stars as well. Admission is free for all three days of the festival, which begins on Aug. 29, and the shows starting at 5 p.m. each day.



Monday, Sept. 1


Today marks the beginning of Lermontov-Fest, a fall festival celebrating the life of one of Russia’s most remarkable poets who, in a fate eerily similar to Pushkin’s, was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Organized by the Lermontov Library System, the next several months will see art exhibitions, concerts and public lectures focusing on the Lermontov’s short yet prolific career. Check the Lermontov Library System’s website for more details.



Tuesday, Sept. 2


Join expats and practice your Russian during the Russian Club’s weekly meetings every Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. The club is free to participate in although you need to be a registered member of Couchsurfing.



Times Talk