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Putin Signs Counterpart U.S. Tax Law

Published: July 2, 2014 (Issue # 1818)


President Vladimir Putin has signed a law allowing Russian banks to send information about U.S. tax payers to their native government and appease a contentious piece of legislation known as FATCA.

This has come as a relief to Russia’s largest banks, who will face the equivalent of a 30 percent tax on various key investments in the U.S. — including the interest and dividend payments on U.S. securities, stocks and bonds — if they fail to comply with the U.S. regulations.

The Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, or FATCA — which came into force on Tuesday — was initially devised in 2010 as a way to keep U.S. corporations and individuals from avoiding U.S. taxes by funneling money into accounts abroad. The law requires foreign banks to inform the IRS of any accounts held by U.S. taxpayers, to provide information about these accounts on the treasury’s request and even to withhold money from clients suspected of tax evasion.

For over a year, the U.S. has been busily negotiating information-sharing agreements with countries worldwide. Eighty-six have already reached official or preliminary arrangements with the U.S., including China, who joined the list just last week, and known tax havens such as the Cayman Islands.

Russia is not on the list. The two sides were deep in negotiations up until March, but the Treasury Department quietly abandoned the talks after Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the international condemnation that followed. Russian financiers were left in the lurch and on course to collide with FATCA’s rapidly approaching July 1 deadline.

“I have not heard of any other countries who were in a similar situation, who were both deeply integrated into the international financial system and did not have an opportunity to finish the negotiations,” said Konstantin Kochetkov, international partner and FATCA expert at the Moscow office of international law firm Morgan Lewis.

Fearful of the penalties for violating FATCA, Russia’s second largest banking group, VTB, even decided to “phase out” relations with its 2,000 U.S. clients last month. VTB president Mikhail Zadornov told Interfax on Monday that the bank no longer plans on cutting off its U.S. clients.

In its final form, the new law, signed by Putin on June 28 and published Monday on the government’s legislation portal, will allow Russian banks to meet FATCA’s requirements — but only under the constant and empowered scrutiny of domestic authorities.

Within three days of registering with foreign tax authorities, Russian financial organizations — including banks, life insurance agencies, stock market traders and more — will have to inform state market watchdog Rosfinmonitoring, the Federal Tax Service and the Central Bank that they have done so.

The banks will have to declare any foreign clients subject to foreign account legislation, such as FATCA, to these agencies, as well as announcing any requests for information from a foreign tax authority. Any information sent abroad must first be sent to them 10 days in advance.

Rosfinmonitoring will also have the authority to unilaterally block information transfers abroad.

Banks will only be able to provide a taxpayers’ information if the foreign citizen consents to it, but if they refuse, the banks will have the option of severing its contract with that client. Companies are considered foreign if more than 10 percent of their charter capital is controlled by entities registered outside Russia and its Customs Union partners Belarus and Kazakhstan.

A total of 515 Russian banks had registered with the IRS by early June, according to the U.S. Treasury.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Jan. 26


Feeling stressed by the crisis? The Northwest Coach University at 3 Ulitsa Vostsstanaya is hosting a master class by lifecoach Tatiana Almazova. She will shed light on the coaching process, the usefulness of coaching during times of economic downturn and how coaching can improve your career and business prospects. The event starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Pre-register by calling 424 3700.



Discover the State Hermitage Museum's collection of English painting at a lecture by art historian Yelizaveta Renne at the Prince Galitzine Library, 46 Nab. Reki Fontanki. The event starts at 6 p.m. and the lecture will be followed by a concert of arias, songs and duets by English composer Henry Purcell. The event is free of charge.



Tuesday, Jan. 27


Celebrate the 71st anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on Palace Square with a free concert at 7 p.m. Listen to WWII-era songs and the poetry of Olga Bergholz while you peruse outdoor exhibitions dedicated to life during wartime. The event is capped off by a fireworks display at 9 p.m.



Stop by the Lexica School of Foreign Languages at 73 Ligovsky Prospekt from now until Friday for a free English lesson. The classes start at 7 p.m. and cover all levels, from Beginner to Advanced. Registration by telephone on 7641692 and a desire to improve your skills are the only prerequisites.



Wednesday, Jan. 28



Feel like becoming a publishing mogul? Stop by the Freedom anti-cafe at 7 Ulitsa Kazanskaya today at 8 p.m. where Simferopol, Crimea-based founder and chief editor of the Holst online magazine will talk about creating an internet magaine, including what stories to cover, how find an audience and build a team, where to find inspiration and how to stand out from the crowd. Admission is the normal price of the anti-café — 2 rubles per minute, which includes tea and snacks.



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