Monday, October 20, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Ministry Says Harsher Sanctions Would Cost Russia 0.3% of GDP

Published: July 12, 2014 (Issue # 1819)



  • Russian economic growth has been sputtering since 2012 and the country entered technical recession in the first half of 2014, according to HSBC.
    Photo: Maxim Stulov / Vedomosti

An upsurge in international tensions and further sanctions slapped on sectors of the Russian economy over the country's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine would cost Russia 0.2 to 0.3 percent of the GDP this year, according to Russia's Finance Ministry.

But longer-term implications could be broader, crippling the country's much-needed modernization drive and hampering Russia's ability to emerge from an sharp economic slowdown, the ministry said Thursday a budgetary policy outline for 2015-2017 published on its website.

In the international furore that followed Russia's land grab in March, the European Union blacklisted about 60 Russian top officials, businessmen and companies, while the U.S. sanctioned some 50 names, banned cooperation in the nuclear and space industries and restricted the sale of hi-tech products to Russia.

Broader sanctions against whole sectors of the Russian economy, including its main staple, oil and gas, have been threatened, but not implemented. Skeptics said such sanctions would backfire against the EU, Russia's leading trade partner which is also heavily reliant on Russian petroleum exports. The ministry's forecast assumes no "sectoral" sanctions will be imposed.

Broad damage has been done, however — the spike in uncertainty has sent the perceived risks of operating in Russia skyrocketing, leading Western banks to shy away from the country, while many companies not already tied into Russia have put investment plans on hold. The value of syndicated loans granted to Russian commodities producers plummeted by 82 percent to $3.5 billion in the first half of this year, Bloomberg reported this week.

Russian economic growth has been sputtering since 2012, and the country entered technical recession in the first half of 2014, according to HSBC, though official statistics indicated GDP growth of 1.1 percent between January and May.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Oct. 20


Amateur pictures from World War I are on display for only one more day at Rosphoto’s exhibition “On Both Sides,” chronicling the conflict through the eyes of observers on both sides of the trenches. The price of entrance to the exhibition is 100 rubles ($2.50).



Tuesday, Oct. 21


The Environment, Health and Safety Committee of AmCham convenes this morning at 9 a.m. in the organization’s office.


Take the chance to pick the brains of Dmitry V. Krivenok, the deputy director of the Economic Development Agency of the Leningrad region, and Mikhail D. Sergeev, the head of the Investment Projects Department, during the meeting with them this morning hosted by SPIBA. RSVP for the event by emailing office@spiba.ru before Oct. 17 if you wish to attend.


Improve your English at Interactive English, the British Book Center’s series of lessons on vocabulary and grammar in an informal atmosphere. Starting at 6 p.m., each month draws attention to different topics in English, with the topic for this month’s lessons being “visual arts.”



Times Talk