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2 Million Ruble Patriotic Graffiti on Crimea Painted Over in Moscow

Published: July 15, 2014 (Issue # 1819)



  • According to activist Alexander Dyagilev, the patriotic mural cost 2 million rubles to make.
    Photo: Vladimir Filonov / SPT

A graffitied wall bearing the words "Crimea and Russia together forever" has been painted over in Moscow, much to the disgust of the pro-Kremlin activist who commissioned the original artwork.

In a post published Wednesday on the VKontakte social-network, activist Alexander Dyagilev offered up a 100,000 ruble ($2,900) reward to anyone who had information about the cover up of the patriotic mural.

Andrei Novichkov, a member of the preservation group Arkhnadzor, said Friday on his Twitter page that he had asked Moscow's central administrative district authorities to remove the artwork, which had earlier drawn complaints from a local district councillor.

The controversial mural appeared on the side of a historical building on Moscow's Ulitsa Solzhenitzina shortly after Russia's annexation of the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea in March. News agency Yopolis reported the design had been cleared by central administrative district authorities.

Dyagilev, a former member of pro-Kremlin youth groups Nashi and Molodaya Gvardiya, told Metro newspaper in March that he had paid for the artwork out of his own pocket, which cost him about 2 million rubles ($58,000).

The artwork was part of a design project called "2000 Houses in Russia," which aims to cover the walls of thousands of buildings with patriotic artwork.





 

ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Sept. 1


Today marks the beginning of Lermontov-Fest, a fall festival celebrating the life of one of Russia’s most remarkable poets who, in a fate eerily similar to Pushkin’s, was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Organized by the Lermontov Library System, the next several months will see art exhibitions, concerts and public lectures focusing on the Lermontov’s short yet prolific career. Check the Lermontov Library System’s website for more details.



Tuesday, Sept. 2


Join expats and practice your Russian during the Russian Club’s weekly meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m. The club is free to participate in although you need to be a registered member of Couchsurfing.



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