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2 Million Ruble Patriotic Graffiti on Crimea Painted Over in Moscow

Published: July 15, 2014 (Issue # 1819)



  • According to activist Alexander Dyagilev, the patriotic mural cost 2 million rubles to make.
    Photo: Vladimir Filonov / SPT

A graffitied wall bearing the words "Crimea and Russia together forever" has been painted over in Moscow, much to the disgust of the pro-Kremlin activist who commissioned the original artwork.

In a post published Wednesday on the VKontakte social-network, activist Alexander Dyagilev offered up a 100,000 ruble ($2,900) reward to anyone who had information about the cover up of the patriotic mural.

Andrei Novichkov, a member of the preservation group Arkhnadzor, said Friday on his Twitter page that he had asked Moscow's central administrative district authorities to remove the artwork, which had earlier drawn complaints from a local district councillor.

The controversial mural appeared on the side of a historical building on Moscow's Ulitsa Solzhenitzina shortly after Russia's annexation of the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea in March. News agency Yopolis reported the design had been cleared by central administrative district authorities.

Dyagilev, a former member of pro-Kremlin youth groups Nashi and Molodaya Gvardiya, told Metro newspaper in March that he had paid for the artwork out of his own pocket, which cost him about 2 million rubles ($58,000).

The artwork was part of a design project called "2000 Houses in Russia," which aims to cover the walls of thousands of buildings with patriotic artwork.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Jan. 26


Feeling stressed by the crisis? The Northwest Coach University at 3 Ulitsa Vostsstanaya is hosting a master class by lifecoach Tatiana Almazova. She will shed light on the coaching process, the usefulness of coaching during times of economic downturn and how coaching can improve your career and business prospects. The event starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Pre-register by calling 424 3700.



Discover the State Hermitage Museum's collection of English painting at a lecture by art historian Yelizaveta Renne at the Prince Galitzine Library, 46 Nab. Reki Fontanki. The event starts at 6 p.m. and the lecture will be followed by a concert of arias, songs and duets by English composer Henry Purcell. The event is free of charge.



Tuesday, Jan. 27


Celebrate the 71st anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on Palace Square with a free concert at 7 p.m. Listen to WWII-era songs and the poetry of Olga Bergholz while you peruse outdoor exhibitions dedicated to life during wartime. The event is capped off by a fireworks display at 9 p.m.



Stop by the Lexica School of Foreign Languages at 73 Ligovsky Prospekt from now until Friday for a free English lesson. The classes start at 7 p.m. and cover all levels, from Beginner to Advanced. Registration by telephone on 7641692 and a desire to improve your skills are the only prerequisites.



Wednesday, Jan. 28



Feel like becoming a publishing mogul? Stop by the Freedom anti-cafe at 7 Ulitsa Kazanskaya today at 8 p.m. where Simferopol, Crimea-based founder and chief editor of the Holst online magazine will talk about creating an internet magaine, including what stories to cover, how find an audience and build a team, where to find inspiration and how to stand out from the crowd. Admission is the normal price of the anti-café — 2 rubles per minute, which includes tea and snacks.



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