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From the Kursk to MH17, Putin Just Doesn't Care

Published: July 21, 2014 (Issue # 1820)




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In a twist of morbid irony, the village of Hrabove, or Grabovo, in eastern Ukraine, is only one letter away from having the word "coffin" in its name — grob in Russian. Today it is the scene of devastation and loss not seen in Europe since the Lockerbie disaster.

Debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 is scattered over the rolling fields. Shocked residents describe bodies falling from the sky, a woman's shed roof perforated by one of the victims. Two days after the crash, his body had still not been removed.

Predictably, the Russian and Ukrainian governments both point the finger toward the other in assigning responsibility for bringing down the civilian aircraft. There are widely circulated rumors, apparently spread by the Russian Federal Aviation Agency, that President Vladimir Putin's flight from Latin America was the original target. There are outright bonkers conspiracies on the Russian Internet involving the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, U.S. special forces, fake passports and the "strange" Facebook profiles of victims.

And the most credible version of them all: that the tragedy was a result of a mistake by the pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine who thought they had brought down a Ukrainian military plane and bragged about it on the Internet with the phrase, "We told them not to fly over our skies." But this is not about who operated the Buk missile launcher that likely caused the disaster.

This is about the cynicism, the disregard for human life and suffering that has been the staple approach of President Vladimir Putin since his ascent to power.

It is difficult to forget the tension and horror that the people of Russia — or at least the people of Russia that I know — felt as we watched the Kremlin abandon the 118 crew members of the nuclear submarine Kursk, the sailors left to suffocate at the bottom of the Barents Sea.

It took Putin five days to interrupt his summer vacation, as the country held its breath in hope that the sailors who were still alive might be rescued. His impossible-to-forget response to Larry King's question of what happened to the submarine was a smirking, "It sank."

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Nov. 23


Get in the holiday spirit at today’s Winter Bazzar at the Astoria Hotel. Featuring gifts from around the world such as French eclairs, Dutch cheeses and Indian jewelry, the annual event organized by the International Women’s Club will feature 18 international stands and raise money for charity through the sales of a diversity of products that further illustrate the city’s international connections.



Monday, Nov. 24


Dr. Axel Schulte, Department Head at Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics in Dortmund, Germany, is the featured speaker at the SPIBA Industrial Committee lecture on “The Fourth Industrial Revolution: Digitalization of the Supply Chain.” The event begins at 4 p.m. at the Graduate School of Management at 3 Volkohvsky Pereulok and registration is required by Nov. 21 either by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.



Tuesday, Nov. 25


Tag along with AmCham during their “Industrial St. Petersburg” Tour program today. This incarnation of the ongoing series will visit Philip Morris Izhora and include an Environmental Health and Safety Committee meeting.


Find out how to expand your business east during the “Business With China” forum beginning today and concluding tomorrow at the Lenexpo convention center. The largest Russian forum dedicated to business with the Asian giant, topics that will be discussed include logistics, customs clearance, trade financing and many more.



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